Literary devices and identity

Repetition[ edit ] Repetition is the essential comedic device and is often used in combination with other devices to reinforce them. The "callback" in comedy writing—in which a statement or theme is recalled as the punchline or close of a scene—is a classic example of the tension and release that are possible using repetition. It is also the basis for "Englishman, Irishman, and Scotsman" jokes, where repetition is used to set up a modus operandi and build tension before the Irishman usually assumed to be the stupid one provides the resolving juxtaposition. Hyperbole, or Overstatement[ edit ] Main article:

Literary devices and identity

A hyperbole is a literary device wherein the author uses specific words and phrases that exaggerate and overemphasize the basic crux of the statement in order to produce a grander, more noticeable effect. The purpose of hyperbole is to create a larger-than-life effect and overly stress a specific point.

Imagery is not limited to only visual sensations, but also refers to igniting kinesthetic, olfactory, tactile, gustatory, thermal and auditory sensations as well. The gushing brook stole its way down the lush green mountains, dotted with tiny flowers in a riot of colors and trees coming alive with gaily chirping birds.

In literature the internal rhyme is a practice of forming a rhyme in only one lone line of verse. An internal rhyme is also known as the middle rhyme because it is typically constructed in the middle of a line to rhyme with the bit at the end of the same metrical line. It is a literary practice typical of the older classical poetry genre.

In present day literature it is usually used for the purpose of laying emphasis this literary device is more prevalent in poetry than prose because it helps to arrange the poem in a manner that catches the attention of the reader not only with its content but also with its physical appearance; a result of the peculiar structuring.

In the much known and read Paradise Lost, Milton wrote: The use of irony in literature refers to playing around with words such that the meaning implied by a sentence or word is actually different from the literal meaning. Often irony is used to suggest the stark contrast of the literal meaning being put forth.

The deeper, real layer of significance is revealed not by the words themselves but the situation and the context in which they are placed.

Literary devices and identity

What fine luck I have! The sentence on the surface conveys that the speaker is happy with their luck but actually what they mean is that they are extremely unhappy and dissatisfied with their bad luck.

Juxtaposition is a literary device wherein the author places a person, concept, place, idea or theme parallel to another.

The purpose of juxtaposing two directly or indirectly related entities close together in literature is to highlight the contrast between the two and compare them. This literary device is usually used for etching out a character in detail, creating suspense or lending a rhetorical effect.

In Paradise Lost, Milton has used juxtaposition to draw a parallel between the two protagonists, Satan and God, who he discusses by placing their traits in comparison with one another to highlight their differences. The use of Kennings in literature is characteristically related to works in Old English poetry where the author would use a twist of words, figure of speech or magic poetic phrase or a newly created compound sentence or phrase to refer to a person, object, place, action or idea.

The use of imagery and indicative, direct and indirect references to substitute the proper, formal name of the subject is known as kennings. The use of kennings was also prevalent in Old Norse and Germanic poetry. Kennings are rare in modern day language. Here are a few examples from Beowulf:Repetition is the essential comedic device and is often used in combination with other devices to reinforce them.

The "callback" in comedy writing—in which a statement or theme is recalled as the punchline or close of a scene—is a classic example of the tension and release that are possible using repetition.

Slaves to Fashion: Black Dandyism and the Styling of Black Diasporic Identity [Monica L. Miller] on ashio-midori.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Slaves to Fashion is a pioneering cultural history of the black dandy, from his emergence in Enlightenment England to his contemporary incarnations in the cosmopolitan art worlds of London and New York.

Literary Devices used in MACBETH Imagine how dull a Shakespearean play would be without the ingenious literary devices and techniques that contribute so much to the fulfillment of its reader or viewer.

Macbeth, by William Shakespeare, is a tragedy that combines fact and legend to tell the story of an eleventh century king. Introduction. Commonly, the term Literary Devices refers to the typical structures used by writers in their works to convey his or her message(s) in a simple manner to his or her readers.

When employed properly, the different literary devices help readers to appreciate, interpret and analyze a literary work.

Identity Crisis as Literary Theme Homework Help Questions Which author first put forward the theme "identity crisis" in the history of literature, and what Psychologist Erik Erikson coined the. First you have to recognize that all fictional writing from great to poor is absolutely littered with literary devices.

You need to familiarize yourself with the various devices and then go hunting them.

Comedic device - Wikipedia