Comparison functionalism and conflict theory

DurkheimKarl MarxMax WeberStructural FunctionalismSymbolic Interaction ismThe Conflict Theory Functionalism versus the Conflict Theory versus Symbolic Interactionism Functionalism, the conflict theory and symbolic interactionism are three distinct and common sociological perspectives that share differences and similarities due to the methods in which they evaluate society. Several sociologists, including Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber, contributed to these extensive, diverse theories. Functionalism, the conflict theory and symbolic interactionism is the study of functions, social inequality and symbolic meanings, respectively.

Comparison functionalism and conflict theory

Blau and Richard M. Emerson, who in addition to Homans are generally thought of as the major developers of the exchange perspective within sociology. Although there are various modes of exchange, Homans centered his studies on dyadic exchange.

When one finds they are rewarded for their actions, they tend to repeat the action. The more often a particular stimulus has resulted in a reward in the past, the more likely it is that a person will respond to it. The more often in the recent past a person has received a particular reward, the less valuable any further unit of that reward becomes.

Peter Blau focused his early writings on social exchange theory more towards the economic and utilitarian perspective, whereas Homans focused on reinforcement principles which presuppose individuals base their next social move on past experiences.

Homans believed that social exchange theory was based on reinforcement principles. According to Emerson, Exchange is not a theory, but a framework from which other theories can converge and be compared to structural functionalism.

To him, the meaning of individual self-interest is a combination of economic and psychological needs. They developed a theoretical framework based on the interdependence of actors.

They also highlighted social implications of different forms of interdependence such as reciprocal control. The study of the theory from the microeconomics perspective is attributed to Blau. Blau stated that once this concept is understood, it is possible to observe social exchanges everywhere, not only in market relations, but also in other social relations like friendship.

The major difference between social and economic exchange is the nature of the exchange between parties. Neoclassic economic theory views the actor as dealing not with another actor but with a market and environmental parameters, such as market price.

The elements of relational life include: Costs are the elements of relational life that have negative value to a person, such as the effort put into a relationship and the negatives of a partner. Rewards are the elements of a relationship that have positive value.

Rewards can be sense of acceptance, support, and companionship etc. As with everything dealing with the social exchange theory, it has as its outcome satisfaction and dependence of relationships. The social-exchange perspective argues that people calculate the overall worth of a particular relationship by subtracting its costs from the rewards it provides.

On the contrary, a negative number indicates a negative relationship. The worth of a relationship influences its outcome, or whether people will continue with a relationship or terminate it. Positive relationships are expected to endure, whereas negative relationships will probably terminate.

Comparison functionalism and conflict theory

In a mutually beneficial exchange, each party supplies the wants of the other party at lower cost to self than the value of the resources the other party provides. In such a model, mutual relationship satisfaction ensures relationship stability.

The "satisfactory-ness" of the rewards that a party gains from an exchange relationship is judged relative to some standard, which may vary from party to party. An example of this is the convoy model of support, this model uses concentric circles to describe relationships around an individual with the strongest relationships in the closet circle.

As a person ages these relationships form a convoy that moves along with the person and exchanges in support and assistance through different circumstances that occur. Within this model there are different types of support Social support a person can receive, those being intangible, tangible, instrumental, and informational.

Intangible support can either be social or emotional and can be love, friendship and appreciation that comes with valuable relationships. Tangible support are physical gifts given to someone such as land, gifts, money, transportation, food, and completing chores.

Instrumental support are services given to someone in a relationship.

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Finally, informational support is the delivering of information that is helpful to an individual. Cost being equal, they choose alternatives from which they anticipate the greatest rewards.

Rewards being equal, they choose alternatives from which they anticipate the fewest costs. Immediate outcomes being equal, they choose those alternatives that promise better long- term outcomes. Long-term outcomes being perceived as equal, they choose alternatives providing better immediate outcomes.

Costs and other rewards being equal, individuals choose the alternatives that supply or can be expected to supply the most social approval or those that promise the least social disapproval. Costs and other rewards being equal, individuals choose statuses and relationships that provide the most autonomy.

Other rewards and costs equal, individuals choose alternatives characterized by the least ambiguity in terms of expected future events and outcomes.

Other costs and rewards equal, they choose alternatives that offer the most security for them. Other rewards and costs equal, they choose to associate with, marry, and form other relationships with those whose values and opinions generally are in agreement with their own and reject or avoid those with whom they chronically disagree.Jan 03,  · Functionalism, the conflict theory and symbolic interactionism is the study of functions, social inequality and symbolic meanings, respectively.

Theory Origin Many helped formulate and grow the functionalist, conflict and symbolic interactionism theories. Compare and contrast st the functionalist and conflict perspectives in sociological analysis Sociology is a social science that seeks to explain and examine the social system basing on the interaction of .

The Abolition of the 50P Tax Rate; The issues around the abolition of the 50P tax rate are related indirectly to arguments around the strengths and weaknesses of the functionalist theory of social stratification and A2 Sociology students who require a little background information on the abolition of the 50 p tax rate may use the following four links to a short BBC item which in my view is.

A Comparison of the Functionalist, Interactionist and Conflict Theories. Over the course of years, sociology, as a science, has provided a relentless body of theories that have focused on studying the different occurrences taking place within the society.

The comparison of functionalism and conflict theory Essay Sample Functionalism and conflict theory are two theories that influence the purposes of schooling.

These two theories are both different and similar in their view and relation to schooling. Functionalism and conflict theory are two theories that influence the purposes of schooling. These two theories are both different and similar in their view and relation to schooling.

Basically, the differences lie in the way these two theories explain /5(3).

from a sociological perspective: AS LEVEL: Functionalist VS Marxist